Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd World Congress and Expo on Green Energy Berlin, Germany.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Peter Novak

University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Keynote: Energy and Sustainable Renevable Energy System with Chemical Storage

Time : 09:00-09:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter Novak photo
Biography:

Peter NOVAK completed his Ph.D. degree in Technical Sciences, University of Belgrade in 1975. Peter NOVAK was professor for HVAC, Renewable energy and Environment and dean at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana. Hi is professor emeritus of Faculty for technology and systems, Novo mesto. Hi is owner of consultant company Energotech. At present is involved in preparation of energy concept of Slovenia for Slovenian government. He is associated with ASHRAE (Fellow and Life member). In the International Institute of Refrigeration served eight years as president of Commission E1 for Air Conditioning (now Honorary Member of IIR) and past Vice chairman of Scientific Committee at European Environmental Agency, Copenhagen (2012-2016). Hi is also honorary member of REHVA, SLOSE, and SITHOK. More than twelve years hi was served as member of Environmental Council of Slovenia.

Abstract:

Quality measure for of energy is exergy. Amount of exergy in energy carriers is very different and prices includs value of quantity and not of the energy quality. Exergy is measure for quality of energy, because the only part of energy available to do work is exergy. Transition to sustainable energy system, without GHG emissions, based on RE, open the questions how to evaluate exergy from solar energy. Solar energy in all form (irradiation, water flows, wind, and biomass) consists from nearly 100% of exergy. Solar energy is for free, conversion systems are not. To exploit at maximum the present infrastructure there is common agreement that we need sustainable energy system with four main energy carriers: electricity, gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. Our vision is the new Sustainable Energy System (SES) based on the biomass carbon recycling using solar and planetary energy for electricity and hydrogen production. SES is based on the existing infrastructure and known chemical processes. With regards to availability of renewable energy resources (RES) it is unrestricted in comparison to present fossil fuels use. The proposed SES consists of the three main energy carriers: electricity, synthetic methane (CH4) and synthetic methanol (CH3OH). Tha last two present also the chemical storage of solar energy.

Keynote Forum

Cliff Dansoh

Kingston University. London. UK

Keynote: The viability of renewable energy and energy storage for the provision of power for desalination

Time : 09:30-10:00

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cliff Dansoh photo
Biography:

Dr Dansoh is a Chartered PhD qualified engineer with over 30 years’ experience in multi discipline industrial environments. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in renewable energy technologies at Kingston University in London and his subject areas of interest include biomass and biofuels, fuel cells and hydrogen, wind and solar power and ocean energy systems, such as wave and tidal power. Before entering academia in 2016, he worked in a variety of roles where he gained extensive engineering experience in the maritime environment, and of managing maritime operations, combined with ten years’ risk management experience within large transportation infrastructure projects.

Abstract:

This research investigates the viability of renewable energy and energy storage to meet a significant and fundamental human need (in this case, large-scale drinking water supplies) unassisted by conventional power. The use of renewable energy to power reverse osmosis desalination plants to provide potable water for around 50,000 people in Newhaven, in South East England, and in Massawa in Eritrea, was investigated. The following energy sources, in a variety of combinations were specifically assessed: • Wind Power • Wave Power • Solar Power • Tidal Current Power • Hydrogen production, storage and use in Fuel Cells The following types of reverse osmosis plants were studied: • No Brine Stream Recovery (BSR) reverse osmosis plant • Pelton Wheel BSR reverse osmosis plant • Pressure Exchanger BSR reverse osmosis plant Modelling was conducted to derive the amount of water that each reverse osmosis plant would deliver from various combinations and amounts of renewable power input, at varying feedwater temperatures. The cost of the scenarios that were able to meet the users’ water demands were compared with the costs associated with the equivalent conventionally-powered scenario over a 25-year life. Specifically, the following were considered:  A coal-fired plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) at Newhaven and A diesel generator at Massawa. This comparison was made with and without the external costs associated with conventional energy production and use. A comparison of the most financially-attractive renewable energy option and the equivalent conventionally-powered scenario at Massawa was undertaken, based on Net Present Value (NPV) methodology.

Keynote Forum

Annarita Salladini

Processi Innovativi srl, Rome Italy

Keynote: Waste to methanol conversion: the bio-methanol circular economy

Time : 10:00-10:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Annarita Salladini  photo
Biography:

Annarita Salladini is a Project Manager currently working for Processi Innovativi, an engineering company owned by KT-Kinetics Technology (Rome, Italy). She received M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering and Ph.D. both from the University of L’Aquila (Italy). She joined Processi Innovativi on 2009 and since then she was involved in R&D project and Engineering Project focused on hydrogen production, renewable energy exploitation, waste conversion processes. Since 2011 she is tutor assistant at the University Campus Biomedico of Rome in the field of Analysis and Simulation of industrial chemical processes. She co-authored several scientific papers in refereed journals and chapters on international books.

Abstract:

With the increasing of population, waste management is becoming more and more a serious problem. The conversion of municipal solid wastes into a valuable and large consumer product could be a successful strategy. On this scenario the waste to bio-methanol route may be a valid alternative to a WtE concept, providing not only an effective waste disposal system but also contributing to the reduction of the greenhouse gases (GHG) emission. The proposed technology infact may account for a reduction of GHG emission up to 54% if compared to waste incinerator and conventional methanol production systems. Main steps involved in this conversion process include high temperature RDF gasification, syngas purification treatment and conditioning up to methanol synthesis. The strength of the proposed technology is enclosed in the gasification method itself, where the adopted operating conditions avoid any production of toxic substances. Moreover the produced syngas is synthesized into methanol molecule and any discharge to the chimney is avoided. When no other external sources are involved, about 50% of the carbon incoming with waste is fixed into methanol product with a synthesis conversion ratio equal to 2.4 ton of RDF per Ton of methanol. The resulted purified biofuel-grade methanol could impact on the market with about 450 €/ton price by exploiting the double counting directive, making it more catching in a bio-fuel economic view. The techno-economic analysis showed that the proposed technology is a valuable and sustainable example of a circular economy, approaching the target of a zero-emission plant.

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Giuliano Dall’O’ photo
Biography:

Giuliano Dall’O’ is an Associate professor in Buildings Physics at Politecnico di Milan and an expert and consultant in many areas relevant to energy conservation, energy efficiency and the use of renewable energies in buildings. In the areas relevant to energy certification of buildings Giuliano is one of the leading experts at national (Italian) but also European level. Giuliano is an expert, in the professional field, in the following subjects: Energy and Sustainable Planning, Sustainable Energy Action PLan, Energy Certificationof Buildings, Energy Audit and Green Energy Audit of Buildings, Zero Energy Building Design and LEED Certification.

Abstract:

In recent years, green architecture is spreading around the world, reflecting a more conscious approach to sustainability by architects but also by the real estate market. Although the market growth of green buildings in many cases it is not fast, the feeling is that we have passed a point of no return and that green architecture is no longer considered experimental architecture, but a practice that is consolidating. The introduction and dissemination of international environmental certification protocols such as LEED has certainly helped to steer the market towards building recognizable models in which performance can be measured and/or evaluated on the basis of uniform criteria. The Protocols, however, necessarily introducing the elements of rigidity could modify the architectural choices, in other words, they may contaminate the Architecture of buildings. Contamination may be positive, if a certi cation protocol triggers a more environmentally-focused design, but it may also be negative, if said protocol becomes a constraint contributing to “globalizing” Architecture. The answer to the aforementioned dilemma, nurturing the cultural debate of the last decade, may only be found if one analyzes buildings through a study of the case studies of green buildings built in a certain period. The study presented in this paper is the result of a synthesis of research conducted on buildings LEED certified or undergoing certification in Italy. Of about 300 buildings that are found in this situation, 30 are analyzed in depth also from the technical point of view. The added value of this study has been the analysis of said buildings based on sustainability, allowing to look at architecture from what we consider to be a privileged point of observation.

  • Waste to Energy | Green Nanotechnology |Green Chemistry | Renewable Energy |Green Economy |Sustainable Energy |Bio-energy |Market research on Green Energy |Entrepreneurs Investment Meet

Session Introduction

Falin Chen

National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Title: The Kuroshio Power Plant For Deep Oceans
Speaker
Biography:

Since he joined the faculty of National Taiwan University in 1989, Professor Falin Chen has devoted himself in researches such as the stability of fluid flow applying on alloy solidification, jet and gravity current and the energy-related issues like the Kuroshio power harness and the hydrogen fuel cells. He has been author or co-author of more than 120 papers published in internationally renowned journals such as J Fluid Mech., Phys. Fluids, Phys. Rev. E and J. Power Sources. He has been the director of Energy Research Center and the University Chair Professor since 2008.

Abstract:

The Kuroshio, a branch of the North Pacific Gyre, flows strongly and stably along the eastern coast of Taiwan and then pass the Ryukyu Islands and Japan. From the perspective of energy development, the Kuroshio is a high-quality ocean current, able to provide a steady and high-volume power output needed to achieve economies of scale and commercial value. In this presentation, we shall initiate a novel design called the Kuroshio Power Plant and discuss the design in details. The deployment of hundreds of turbines in deep waters and their anchorage in a stable formation to the seabed hundreds of meters below is an unprecedented engineering feat. This design is also entailing new approaches to turbine design, anchorage system planning, deep sea marine engineering, and power plant operations and maintenance. The design consists two major portions: the single-cable anchored turbine and the multi-cable anchored relay platform, both are designed to protect power plant from earthquake damage and high-frequency fatigue. These technologies can also be applied to generate power in other waters, such as the Gulf Stream east of Florida, the East Australian Current, the Humboldt Current west of South America, the East Africa Coastal Current, and so on. All these waters feature strong currents and deep waters, similar to those found in the Kuroshio. Finally, since the proposed Kuroshio power plant is a new design and requires deep sea construction, it may entail high research costs and construction risks during the development stage, which will be elucidated as well.

Speaker
Biography:

María del P. Pablo-Romero has completed his PhD in Economics at the Seville University in 2000. Her main topics research are economic growth, energy, renewable energy and policy evaluation. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals as Energy Economics, Energy Policy, Renewable and sustainable energy reviews and energy journal. At the moment, belongs to the Chair of Economy of the Energy and the Environment, being the person in charge of the area of energy and development.

Abstract:

The EU has assumed objectives for energy sustainability and the fight against climate change. In this sense, the generation of biogas allows contributions to the 2020 established targets. The EU is leader in the production of biogas, being the gross electricity production from biogas in the EU in 2014 equal to 57 022.0 GWh. Likewise, its estimated contribution to electricity generation for 2020 in the EU-28 represent 1.5% within the total energy mix. Measures implemented in the EU-28 to promote biogas are analyzed. Likewise, they are related to the country targets established in their National Renewable Energy Action Plans and to their technology costs. Currently, 19 countries of the EU-28 apply some measure of price and/or amount to promote the use of biogas. Of those, 14 use Fit-in tariffs, 6 Fit-in premiums and 1 uses tenders. The countries that do not use any of these measures generally have poor levels of growth of biogas, and are far from fulfilling their 2020 targets. It is observed a trend to reduce public support to promote biogas, linked to the reduction of the cost of this technology, and to the attempt to increasingly link it to the markets. However, excessive linking to the market hinders its development, putting the achievement of 2020 targets at risk, because it cannot be considered that the market is sufficiently mature. In addition, there is a trend seen in the design to limit support for the generation of biogas where certain materials are used for its generation, with the purpose of increasing GHG savings.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr William Stafford is a life scientist with twenty-one years of R&D covering topics ranging from biochemistry, microbial ecology, systems biology, bioenergy, permaculture, holistic resource management, industrial ecology and sustainability science. Bioenergy and the bio-economy is a current a research focus which requires innovative solutions to meet development objectives of economic feasibility, social acceptance, and environmental protection.William has 26 publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals and is currently a researcher in the Green Economy Solutions competency area at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), and an extraordinary associate professor in the Department of Industrial Engineering, Stellenbosch University

Abstract:

Bush encroachment and alien plant invasions alter the composition and/or balance of species in natural ecosystems and impact biodiversity, land productivity and water availability. While progress has been made in restoration programmes, relatively little cost recoveruy has been achived in the form of payment for ecosystem services restored, nor from the value adding opportunities of using woody biomass for timber products, wood fuels and electricity. This paper estimates the value of the benefits from key ecosystem services (water availability, grazing capacity, carbon, timber, wood fuels and electricity) that are provided through the appropriate management of bush encroachment and invasive alien plants in South Africa. The value of ecosystem services from the restoration of bush encroachment was estimated to be US$2.1 billion, while the value of ecosystem services from the restoration of alien plant invasions was estimated to be US$6.6 billion. The most valued ecosystem service benefit assessed was electricity, followed by water, wood-fuels and then grazing and timber products. The value of these ecosystem services are considerable compared to the direct costs involved to clear invasive alien plants and control bush encroachment. For example, using bush encroachment and alien plant biomass for electricity generation could provide 3.6% of South Africa’s electricity with a value of US$ 3.7 bliion, as well as reducing carbon emissions by 133 million tCO2eq per annum. This clearly illustrates that the management of invasive alien plants and bush encroachment can deliver significant ecosystem services benefits whose value outweighs the costs of restoration.

Speaker
Biography:

Sausan Al-Riyami has completed her degree in Physics with minor in Geology in 2007 from SQU, Master degree of Science & Engineering with honor (IGSES Awards) and her Doctorate of Science in Applied Science for Electronics & Materials on 2013 from Kyushu University. She was guest researcher at Institute for Materials Research, Belgium. She was at GUTech before she joined The Research Council in Oman as Reneweable Energy Researcher on 2015. Her recent focous on both Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy. She recieaved outstanding awards and research fund grants, publication of more than 20 papers and serving as scientific reviewer in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C:H) films commonly prepared by chmical vapour depositon (CVD) technique. Although it can be grown in an atmosphere including no hydrogen gas, the hydrogen from a hydrocarbon source gas can infulance the properties of the film. The hydrogen has important roles on the physical properties of the films; however it has never been studied in details thus far. We have reported that nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) films containing no diamond grains are grown without ambient gas by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). On the other hand, in this work the growth of film. The chemical bonding structures, the electrical, and the optical properties of the films were investigated in details using several technigues. The films were deposited on silicon and quartz substrates in hydrogen atmospheres by PLD using a graphite target. The preparation conditions were similar to those in our previous works. The films were studied using several techniques. The carrier density was calculated using electron spin resonance (ESR). For the first to our knowledge non-commercial standard sample was prepared and used to calibrate and quantify the measurements. The standard sample shows a strong stability and it is considered to be competitive to the commercial samples. The ESR investigation was performed at different temperatures. The estimated spin density is relatively high for an insulator UNCD/a-C:H composite film. From the obtained results it is found that ESR is a promising method to study paramagnetic canters and their interaction with hydrogen for films.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Omar Ouda obtained a PhD in Environmental Management from Stuttgart University, Germany in 2003 and a Master of Science in Water and Environmental Resources Management form IHE-Delft, the Netherland in 1999. Omar is a Professional Engineer (P.Eng) in Canada; a Project Management Professional (PMP) and certified LEED AP. Dr. Ouda is currently University Professor at Prince Mohammed Bin Fahd University. He has 20 years of professional and academic experience worldwide. Omar completed more than 50 studies tackled environmental challenges in Canada, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya, UAE, and Palestine. He published more than 60 scientific papers in high ranked international journals and conferences. Majority of his recent publications handled solid waste management and Biomass energy developing countries.

Abstract:

The current world population of 7.2 billion is estimated to increase by 1 billion by 2025 with an annual growth rate of 1%. In the Asian, Middle East, African and Latin American countries, most of this increase will happen due to fast population growth and urbanization. As a result, the average rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) production will increase from 1.2 to 1.4 kg per capita per day in next 15 years across the world. Similarly, the energy demand is growing significantly in developing world, especially in Asia at an annual rate of 3.7% by 2025. The MSW can be a valuable source of biomass, recycled materials, energy and revenue if efficiently and wisely managed. The promises for the conversion of MSW to energy are abundant and can include a wide range of waste sources, conversion technologies, and infrastructure and end-use applications. Several waste-to-energy (WTE) technologies, including pyrolysis, plasma arc gasification, anaerobic digestion (AD), fermentation, incineration, gasification and refused derived fuel (RDF) have been developed to produce energy and value-added products in the form of electricity, transportation fuels, heat, fertilizers, and chemicals. However, there are certain limitations associated with each WTE technology, as it is difficult for an individual process to achieve zero waste concept and competes with other renewable energy sources like wind, and solar. An innovative solution to these limits is to select the WTE technologies based on the country’s waste composition and generation rates and integrate them under waste biorefinery concept. A waste biorefinery will be a group of WTE technologies producing chemicals, fuels, power, products, and materials from different fractions of MSW such as food, plastic, paper, cardboard, fat contents waste, etc. at one platform; similar to an oil refinery. This abstract aims to examine the value of waste biorefineries in developing nations as a solution to MSW landfill problems and as a source of renewable energy production.

Speaker
Biography:

 Naoki Masuhara has been project researcher at Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) from 2013, participating the five-year research project, entitled "Human-Environmental Security in Asia-Pacific Ring of Fire: Water-Energy-Food Nexus" RIHN, Kyoto, Japan. He received his PhD. in engineering from Osaka University (2017). He was secretary staff of the Coalition of Local Governments for Environmental Initiatives (COLGEI, 1999-2013), researcher of the policy institute of COLGEI (2000-2013), guest researcher at Waseda University, Hosei University (2007-) and Osaka University (2014-). His major fields of interests are local environment administration and energy policy

Abstract:

Japan is the third largest country in the world in terms of geothermal resource potentials investigated by the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy. However, installed capacity of geothermal power in Japan has been very limited even after the FIT (Feed-in Tariff) scheme for five renewable energy including geothermal power was adapted in 2012. Major three of the reasons which has pointed out so far are (1) cost problem including long development period and needed legal procedures, (2) related regulations such as the Nature Park Law, and (3) strong objections by local residents especially by the hot spring (ONSEN) owners and inns. Under such circumstance, we developed Japanese inventory consisting of resource potential, development targets, regulations and conflicts of geothermal energy in all 47 prefectures, since each prefecture can set original target to install new geothermal power or direct energy use. Our hypothesis is that there are some relationships between local targets, resource potentials and conflicts which occur in the area, reflecting different digging regulation of each prefectures. The scheme of regulation for digging new hot spring well to start geothermal power has basically been set by national hot spring (ONSEN) law, but each prefecture governor can create original regulations according to local situation. Also, we are investigating whether national target to install renewable energy by 2030 will be achieved or not based on our inventory, because new power plant must be installed in one of the 47 prefectures. Furthermore, we clarified the status quo of local program to support new geothermal energy development in some prefectures through interviewing surveys that have been conducted so far. Local program could be classified by four administrative resources : financial resources, legal resources, human and organizational resources, and  information.

Speaker
Biography:

Daniel Adu is a PhD Student at the National research Centre of Pumps, Jiangsu University, China offering Fluid Machinery Engineering in the Research area of Small Hydropower Development in Africa. Daniel has his expertise in evaluation and passion in improving electricity situation in Africa. He has done a lot of research into how this electricity crisis in Africa especially sub-Saharan Africa can be solved and found small hydropower as one of the best ways to solve these challenges due to its enormous potential in the continent.

Abstract:

A number of resources and efforts have been devoted into many studies in relation to the small hydro potential (SHP) sites in Ghana, but still most of these potential sites are still not yet developed. The rural communities within the Region have been deprived of electricity for so many years now with even those in the urban centers experiencing a lot of power cut off resorting in the development of thermal power as supplement to the inadequate hydropower source in the countries. The importance of small hydropower in the generation for sustainable power based on its capacity to provide electricity to the rural communities as well as contributing to the National grid to towards alleviate the serious shortage of electricity within the sub-Saharan African Region and ensure sustainability of hydropower. This paper focuses on the situation and potentials of small-hydropower in Sub-Saharan Africa particularly the rural areas as well as areas that are still outside the main grid. An equitable complete small hydropower technology report has been presented with the situation of Electricity supply to the rural areas within the Region also presented. this paper has shown that there are many important hydropower resources in Saharan Africa Region with low installation level. Generally, the level of electricity access in the Region is very low combined with various challenges. Challenges preventing development of SHP technology in the Region have been identified and discussed, for instance those relating to technology, climate change, finance, and policy. Small hydropower technology has been discussed as one of the promising spread out power generation system for rural electricity supply in the country. Therefore, the need to develop an extensive small hydropower turbine that can help alleviate the current energy situation and support economic progress of the Sub-Saharan Africa Countries. The paper will draw conclusions on the significance of designing small hydro turbines for Sub-Saharan Africa, and better carrying out small hydropower in Sub-Saharan Africa.