Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd World Congress and Expo on Green Energy Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Xingwu Wang

Alfred University, USA

Keynote: Impacts of Renewables on Electric Vehicle Demands

Time : 08.30-09.00

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xingwu Wang photo
Biography:

Dr. Xingwu Wang is a professor, Renewable Energy, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802, USA. He has published 90 papers and 45 US patents. His most recent research is on the renewable energy, electrical vehicles and sustainability. Dr. Xiaomin Li is a visiting professor at Alfred, currently on leave (from Henan University, China).

Abstract:

Electric vehicle demands have increased rapidly since 2010, and depend on renewables. Using panel data from fourteen countries between 2010 and 2015, we study impacts of seven factors in a multiple linear regression model. The factors include percentage of renewable energies in electricity generation, number of charging stations, education level, population density, gasoline price, GDP per capita and urbanization. The first four factors have apparent and positive impacts on the demands, and the last two factors don’t. The gasoline price affects the demands for BEVs (battery electric vehicles) more than that for PHEVs (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles). One percent increase in renewables would lead to approximately 2-6% increase in EV demands. Based on the results, policy implications are discussed.

Keynote Forum

Sebastian Helgenberger

Head IASS Energy Transition Programme, Germany

Keynote: Social Benefits of Renewables – lessons learned from Germany’s Energiewende

Time : 09:30-10:00

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sebastian Helgenberger photo
Biography:

Dr. Sebastian Helgenberger leads the “Multiple Benefits of Renewables” project at IASS Potsdam. In their research activities and international science-policy dialogues Sebastian and his team are giving particular emphasis on the social and economic benefits of renewable energies as drivers of accelerated transitions towards sustainable energy for all. Sebastian graduated in Environmental Sciences at Leuphana University Lüneburg and conducted his master thesis at ETH Zurich on knowledge co-creation among science and society in sustainability transformations. He also holds a PhD in socio-economics. Throughout his career Sebastian Helgenberger has been committed to advancing and experimenting with the transformative potential of science and research to accompany societal change.

Abstract:

Boosted by impressive technological innovation and cost reductions, renewable energy in a growing number of countries is now primarily considered for its social and economic benefits. Among the benefits of the emerging new energy world are opportunities for local value creation, for responding to growing energy demands and for reducing conflicts over scarce water, which are aggravated by fossil power generation. Allowing for distributed electricity generation, the rapidly expanding renewable energy world is opening up business models for many, including local communities, citizens and citizens’ cooperatives. Sebastian Helgenberger will illustrate the social dimension of renewable energies and the Energiewende (energy transition) – in Germany and internationally. He will share surprising experiences from Germany’s Energiewende, with citizens finding themselves on the driver seat of reshaping the energy market and they way we produce, consume and own energy. Similar developments connected to the societal drivers, game changers and opportunities of renewable energies can be observed around the globe – showing that energy transitions are about much more than energy.

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aaron Praktiknjo photo
Biography:

Aaron Praktiknjo has been an Assistant Professor of Energy Resource and Innovation Economics at RWTH Aachen University since 2015. Before joining RWTH Aachen, he was a team leader and lecturer at the Institute for Energy Engineering, TU Berlin, and served as a consultant for national and international agencies and companies. After studying industrial and civil engineering, Aaron Praktiknjo completed a PhD on the topic of energy supply security at the Chair of Energy Systems at TU Berlin, graduating in 2013 with highest honors. Aaron Praktiknjo has received awards for his research from the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE) and the European Energy Exchange (EEX).

Abstract:

In many countries such as Germany, the expansion in renewable power capacities in only a short time frame has been impressive. Simultaneously, conventional plants such as nuclear power plants are being phased-out of the energy system. But in contrast to conventional power plants, most of the renewable generators only pro-duce electricity if the weather conditions are right, e.g. the sun is shining or the wind is blowing. In general, there are deterministic and probabilistic methods to assess supply secu-rity. In the past, the four German transmission system operators (TSO) have used a deterministic approach (so-called forecast margin). However, with the increase of available data, we opt for a probabilistic approach to assess supply security due to its higher degree in detail of the results. Furthermore, when assessing supply security, the economic perspective also needs to be accounted for. Ideally, investments in supply security should only be made if the resulting benefits from an increase in supply security amounts at least to the in-vestment outlay. With our research, we want to contribute to the economic assess-ment of supply security.

Keynote Forum

Wolfram Sparber

Institute for Renewable Energy at Eurac Research, Italy

Keynote: How to reach renewable energy and climate targets in a cost efficient way – a dynamic energy model applied on regional scale

Time : 10:00-10:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wolfram Sparber photo
Biography:

Wolfram Sparber is heading the Institute for Renewable Energy at Eurac Research since it’s foundation in 2005. Eurac Research is an applied research centre located in Bolzano-Northern Italy. Since 2011 he is vice president of the European Technology and Innovation Platform for Renewable Heating and Cooling (ETIP RHC). Since 2016 he is chairman of the board of directors of the North Italian energy utility Alperia. Alperia is one of the largest renewable energy producers in Italy, and has a special focus on sustainable energy solutions. Wolfram Sparber studied applied physics at Graz University of Technology and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Abstract:

Many countries and regions in Europe and world wide have set ambitous climate and renewable energy targets to be met til 2020, 2030 and 2050. But with which energy system can such targets be met? What technology combination, to which extend, has to be applied to reach the target in a most cost effective way? Can the targets be reached considering technical, social, environmental and economic constraints? Within Eurac Research a method has been developed, that allows the modellers to give answers to these questions considering the hour by hour energy consumption for a referenece year. The North-Italian region of Southtyrol with its energy consumption, building stock, landscape and natural resources, transportation mix and its climate plan (target 1.5 ton CO2 emissions / capita till 2050) has been taken as a demo model. Technical, social and environmental constraints have been considered with regards to the possible expansion of renewable energy sources for electricity and heat production. The energy efficiency potential has been considered, especially with regard to the existing building stock. Therefore a detailed building clusterisation has been carried out with regard to building type, year of construction, applied construction technologies and possible refurbishment interventions and the related investment cost. Further more the mobility sector and its transition to zero emission transport has been considered. The energy model shows that the target can be reached with a series of measures based on today existing technologies. Considering the cost, not only the target scenarios are not more expensive than todays energy system, but especially a very relevant cost part is shifted from fossil fuels in local investment in energy efficiency and technology development; leading to an important push for the local economy. The model can be applied to other regions and countries.

Keynote Forum

Jared Moore

Meridian Energy and Policy Consulting, USA

Keynote: Thermal Hydrogen: An Emissions Free Hydrocarbon Economy

Time : 10:00-10:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jared Moore photo
Biography:

Jared Moore is an independent energy consultant based in Washington, D.C. advising on deep decarbonization of the energy sector. He has published in multiple peer reviewed journals including Environmental Science and Technology, Environmental Research Letters, Energy Procedia (GHGT-12), and the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. He is also a contributing author of the book Variable Renewable Energy and the Electricity Grid. He holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (2008) and a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University (2014).

Abstract:

Thermal Hydrogen is an energy system engineered to enable hydrocarbons as both an emissions free energy suppler and energy carrier. It is based upon the principle of using both products of water (or CO2) splitting: hydrogen (or CO) and oxygen. The H2 (CO) enables chemical energy storage and is intended primarily to provide heat, EV range, and timely/distributed electricity. The purpose of (pure) oxygen is to pre-empt the gas separation work inherent to Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). Pure oxygen also enables hydrocarbons to become increasingly competitive with decarbonization because it enables simpler and more efficient thermodynamic cycles: the Allam cycle for electricity generation and auto-thermal reforming for hydrogen/syngas generation. The supply and presence of hydrocarbon related chemicals also enables emissions free hydrogen energy carriers. Methanol (CH3OH, derived from syngas) is envisioned to serve as a substitute for gasoline to be used in solid oxide fuel cells. The resulting exhaust, carbonated water, is envisioned to be recollected and recycled. Ammonia (NH3) is envisioned to replace natural gas and is produced via the Haber-Bosch process. The nitrogen comes from an air separation unit where the oxygen is used to enable emissions free hydrocarbons. Overall, 90% of the hydrocarbons in the system are oxidzed by oxygen from electrolysis. All chemical energy is stored and distributed as liquids, thus enabling the densest energy storage and distribution system possible.

  • Green Energy | Green Architecture | Bio Remediation | Bio Fuel | Energy Model | Applications of Renewable Energy | Energy Policies

Session Introduction

Aiko Endo

Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan

Title: Human-Environmental Security in the Asia-Pacific Ring of Fire: Water-Energy-Food Nexus
Speaker
Biography:

Aiko Endo received an MSc degree from the Faculty of Science of Plymouth University in the UK, and a PhD from the Graduate School of Biosphere Science of Hiroshima University in Japan. She is an Associate Professor at the national Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) in Japan, and she has currently served as a project leader of the RIHN project entitled “Human-Environmental Security in the Asia-Pacific Ring of Fire: Water-Energy-Food Nexus” based on her experiences of interdisciplinary studies and multi-sectoral practices.

Abstract:

The purposes of the research are to understand the complexity of the water-energy-food (WEF) nexus system and to create policy options to reduce trade-offs among resources and to solve the conflicts of resource users under scientific evidence and uncertainty to maximize human-environmental security. We target surface and groundwater use for energy production including small-hydropower, geothermal, hot spring and shale gas. Conversely, we focus on energy use for pumping, and heating water. In addition, we address water use for fishery and agricultural productions, and water cycle is essential for the ecosystem. We are developing, and using various integrated methods to address the WEF nexus issues. We classified the integrated methods as qualitative and quantitative, and both contribute to both interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary researches. The Qualitative methods that we analysed consisted of Questionnaire Surveys, Ontology Engineering and Integrated Map. The quantitative methods included Physical Models, Benefit-cost analysis, Integrated Indices, and Optimization Management Models. As a result, we identified the pros and cons of each method. To address to temporal scale, we determined if we could use each method to address nexus during initial stage, developing stage and policy planning stage of the project to make future scenarios. We also challenged to design nexus systems to understand the complexities of nexus system, to visualize the linkages between events, to identify trade-offs and find efficiency of resource use, to define academic concepts of nexus, and to contribute to scenario planning, using otology methodology.

Speaker
Biography:

Tanja Barth is professor at the Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Norway. Her research addresses thermochemical biomass conversion for biofuel and chemicals production in an organic chemistry perspective, in parallel with and studies on petroleum composition and alteration.

Abstract:

Lignocellulosic biomass is a widely available resource that can be used as feedstock for production of renewable motor fuels, solid fuels and bulk and fine chemicals. If waste biomass streams and fractions are used, a high level of sustainability can be achieved. The lignin fraction of such biomass comprises a waste stream both from pulping and bio-ethanol applications, and is thus a good feedstock for further use for bio-energy. Here, we present results from solvolytic thermal conversion of lignin and lignin-rich residues that provide a bio-oil that can be used as a motor fuel with some further upgrading. Alternatively, chemicals from the bio-oil can be extracted and used as e.g. renewable plastic monomers, providing value-added streams in a biorefinery concept. The lignin-to-liquid (LtL) conversion is done with water or ethanol as the reaction medium and formic acid (FA) as depolymerisation aid for converting lignin to phenolic monomers. FA also acts as a hydrogen source. The conversion is done in batch reactors at 300-380 °C with corresponding pressures of 200-300 bar, and provides recoveries of more than 90 % by weight and 80 % as carbon in the oil phase at optimal conditions. Tuning the time, temperature and loading parameters enables production of different oil qualities. Heterogeneous catalysts can be used to increase oil yields relative to solid products, tune oil composition and reduce the reaction severity required. In this presentation, results from conversion of a wide range of lignin qualities will be given, both for laboratory and pilot scale conversion.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Renato O. Arazo has completed his PhD in Envirnmental Engineering from the University of the Philippines Diliman Quezon City. In the course of his doctorate, he was sent by the Philippine government to Texas A&M University for a PhD Sandwich Program to specialize in biofuel and bioenergy. He is currently the director of Project Development Office of his university – the University of Science and Technology of Southern Philippines. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as reviewer of some ISI journals.

Abstract:

The optimization of bio-oil produced from sewage sludge using fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Effects of temperature, sludge particle size and vapor residence time on bio-oil properties, such as yield, high heating value (HHV) and moisture content were evaluated through experimental and statistical analyses. Characterization of the pyrolysis products (bio-oil and biogas) was also done. Optimum conditions produced a bio-oil product with an HHV that is nearly twice as much as lignocellulosic-derived bio-oil, and with properties comparable to heavy fuel oil. Contrary to generally acidic bio-oil, the sludge-derived bio-oil has almost neutral pH which could minimize the pipeline and engine corrosions. The Fourier Transform Infrared and gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of bio-oil showed a dominant presence of gasoline-like compounds. These results demonstrate that fast pyrolysis of sewage sludge from domestic wastewater treatment plant is a favorable technology to produce biofuels for various applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Jin Li, Male, Ph.D, Doctoral tutor, Professor of School of Architecture, SCUT (South China University of Technology) and State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Building Science, Reviewer of Building and Environment and Energy and Building, Visiting Scholar at Delft University of Technology, National 1st class registered architect, who was in charge of the design of large public buildings and green buildings, such as volleyball arena of The 16th Asian Games in Guangzhou in 2010.

Abstract:

The roof design is a critical part of the design of large-space stadium. With the increasing requirement of sports environment, a good design of stadium roof not only with reasonable structure but also has the function of improving the sports thermal environment of stadium and improving the sports thermal comfort of the exerciser. Through the research of sports thermal comfort under the large-space green roof in the specific climatic conditions, this study primary got the relationship between the sports thermal comfort in the stadium and the thickness of cover soil & the plant disposition of green roof. It not only provides a theoretical basis for creating a healthy sports environment under the green roof, but also provides a theoretical foundation for upgrading the existing sports environment. Firstly, this study use software to simulate 2 stadiums in Guangzhou in Summer. One stadium with exposed roof and the other one with cover soil green roof. Then a preliminary study of the relationship between 2 roof design strategies and thermal environment of stadium be made through data arrangement and analysis. Secondly, several stadium models in Guangzhou area of China be simulated in software, each one with the same roof structure and with the different parameters of cover soils, such as the thickness of cover soil and the plant disposition. And then, basing on the SETsport (Standard Effective Temperature under the state of sports)which gained through modifying the calculation parameters of SET(Standard Effective Temperature), the stadium models with good sports thermal environment be selected.Finally, through analyzing the data of the stadium models with good sports thermal environment, this study got the correlation rules between parameters of cover soils and indoor sports thermal environment & sports thermal comfort.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Elsarrag is a Director – Research and Development- at the Gulf Organisation for Research & Development. He has more than 25 years of experience in higher education and building industry, gained through his work in the Middle East and Europe. In additional to his work as a consultant, he continues to be active in scientific research in buildings and energy. He has delivered invited lectures and published papers in reputed institutions and journals. He has specialist expertise in sustainable developments, energy efficiency, energy modelling and building services. He is the managing editor of the International Journal of the Sustainable Built Environment, sponsored by GORD and published by Elsevier.

Abstract:

The Gulf Region countries have extreme climatic conditions and impose a heavy reliance on cooling, mostly electricity-based, and thus a strong and structural dependency of a high energy resource. In Doha-Qatar, the average highest outdoor temperatures during a year is 37.0°C however, high-temperature values that exceed 46°C could be observed in summer. As shown in Fig. 1, the temperature exceeds the 40°C for more than 300 hours which anticipated to be doubled when considering Doha climate change 2025. The design and construction of buildings in hot-humid climates requires high energy consumption typically for air conditioning due to higher thermal loads. Regionally, there is a rising concern on the current rate of energy consumption due to air conditioning. Considering the wider impacts of carbon emissions on our climate, and the need to reduce these emissions, effective energy efficiency solutions are necessary in order to achieve the overall goal of reducing carbon emissions. This paper presents the simulated and measured efficiencies of the “All in One” 15 TR (52 kW) fully integrated HVAC systems driven by-product of rejected brine, waste heat and solar absorption chiller. The tested system is locally manufactured and installed in a testing facility at Qatar Science and Technology Park (QSTP). The system has shown more than 60% reduction in energy consumption compared to conventional systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Azra Korjenic led and is leading several projects concerning façade greening. Two of her projects already won the Energy Globe of Vienna. She is member and active in the Association for Greened Buildings Austria. Within her activities she is up to date concerning the international research and knows that the questions in this project are not answered yet, but asked by researchers, journalists and policy makers

Abstract:

The Paper shows how façade greening effects the heat resistance value on an old building. The façades of the building are made out of bricks. Two greened façades with different living wall systems have been researched and measured for one heating season. At the same time two not greened parts of the façade were measured. So far there does not exist any general method, how to calculate the U-value or particular heat resistance values of the greened facades. The method which is developed within this research-paper makes the comparison between the greened part of the façade and the not greened part possible. It turned out that there is a difference of the thermal resistance between greened and not greened parts of the façades in winter. The improvement by the greening will be discussed within this paper.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed Hamza H Ali is a Professor of Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning at Assiut University and Professional Certified Consultant for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency as well as, Egypt since June 1987. In April 1999, he obtained the Doctoral Degree in Engineering from Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido, JAPAN. He received his BSc. Degree in Mechanical Engineering, from Assiut University, Egypt, in June 1986. Ahmed Hamza worked as a Professor of Energy Systems at Fraunhofer Institute for Energy Systems and Environmental Engineering, UMSICHT, Germany from March 2006 to April 2008. He is a Professional Engineer in HVAC (Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems as well as solar energy systems. His principal areas of research and expertise: currently leading activities in the basic and applied research in Renewable Energy Systems including Solar Energy Cooling and Heating Systems, Thermal Energy Storage Systems, Thermal analysis for cooling and heating of buildings including Industrial Energy audit and energy efficiency. Honors: Member of International Solar Energy Society (ISES) since 1994 until now. Awards: Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany, Fellowship (March 2006 - April 2008). He has published more than 150 papers (over 60 in refereed Int. J., with H-index 12), five books and 6 BK chapters.

Abstract:

In 2015, the energy demand in Egypt was higher than production and represented one of the barriers for further development. However, the national short-term energy plane which implemented in 2016 decreased the issue into the minimum. This shortage is clearly larger during summer time due to extra energy demand required to drive vapor compression air conditioners to cover the building's cooling load demand. In many kinds of literature, it is reported that conventional air conditioning systems (A/C) has a large contribution to the buildings energy consumption and represent more than 70 % of building energy consumption in the Middle East. Besides, the role of those A/C system refrigerants in the harmful emissions leads to the greenhouse gasses effect, while, few of those systems refrigerants contribute to depletion of the ozone layer. Nowadays there are many available passive techniques, or active technologies have been used to provide the thermal comfort condition within buildings that can be utilized as an alternative solution for reducing current energy consumption and the harmful gasses emissions. However, practical and energy efficient hybrid active and passive system that provide the cooling for buildings in summer session at best cost performance is a still a challenge worldwide and in particular in most developing countries located in hot, arid areas. In this study, the innovative design of wind catcher with fog injection system that is appropriate for use in hot, dry areas is investigated. This followed by an assessment of the hourly values of the air flow rate with quantitative values of the outlet air psychrometric properties from this hybrid system that proposed to provide thermal comfort condition for a school building in the hot, arid area is evaluated.

Speaker
Biography:

Sausan Al-Riyami has completed her degree in Physics with minor in Geology in 2007 from SQU, Master degree of Science & Engineering with honor (IGSES Awards) and her Doctorate of Science in Applied Science for Electronics & Materials on 2013 from Kyushu University. She was guest researcher at Institute for Materials Research, Belgium. She was at GUTech before she joined The Research Council in Oman as Reneweable Energy Researcher on 2015. Her recent focous on both Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy. She recieaved outstanding awards and research fund grants, publication of more than 20 papers and serving as scientific reviewer in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Cooling for a building is a critical issue for hot climate countries such as Sultanate of Oman. Electricity driven chillers commonly used for this pupose. However, they consume remarkable electrical energy compared with thermal driven chillers. This project aims to develop a worldwide unique concept for a continuously operating hybrid cooling system with a thermally driven chiller based on renewable energy resources. The energy for a sustainable cold supply can be developed from heat energy sources. For hot country like Oman solar heat supply is definetly the best option with an expected fluctuating. In order to over come this challenge and using the wondeful geological of Oman a geothermal heat by studing the potential of the energy. Therefore, a combination of both, called hybrid cooling, might provide an excellent solution of this challenge. For the stublization of the system it is advisable to foresee storage systems which can be realized in the underground. The challenge is to investigate, to develop, and to establish a combined system of geothermal and solar heat and an underground storage system together with specific technical solutions of absorption chillers adapted to the different sources. A demonstrator of such an innovative system will be realized at the end of the the project and installed at the one of the building of the Innoviation Park Musct (IPM) in Oman.The realization will present a great progress of an environmentally friendly and sustainable energy option especially for hot climate countries.

Speaker
Biography:

Mansi is in the final year of her PhD from Department of Governance and Technology for Sustainability (CSTM) at University of Twente, The Netherlands. Her doctoral study aims at understanding energy transitions in the buildings sector in India with focus on wide scale uptake of Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB) niche development. Mansi also works as a Project Manager in International Institute for Energy Conservation and hads strong industry experience in policy analysis and implementation and energy transition advocacy in the built environment. She has provided advisory to various government institutions and development agencies (USAID, UNDP, UNIDO).

Abstract:

As global warming and fossil fuel depletion highlight the need to save energy and reduce our carbon footprint, the net zero-energy building (NZEB) concept is gaining prominence worldwide. NZEB is still at a nascent stage of niche formation in a developing economy such as India. Large scale adoption and implementation of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies can transform the building sector towards a low carbon future. The paper aims to assess the role of governments in adoption and uptake of NZEBs by addressing the research question: What is the role of governments in spurring NZEB niche development in India from governance perspective? The study uses the Governance Assessment Tool (GAT) along with the Sectoral System Innovation Assessment Framework (SSAIf) to analyse NZEB niche development in the New Delhi region in India. A case study research design is used to assess governance conditions regarding NZEB niche development. Data collection involved indepth interviews with ten key stakeholders and were analyzed using qualitative analysis software program of Atlas ti. The results show that governments can initiate changes in structure, user practices, culture, regulations and networks by influencing particular governance conditions such as: i)strategies and instruments used by governments, and ii) actor network formation, in particular engaging relevant stakeholders in policy making process and NZEB projects.

Biography:

Sayed Ahmed  is a Bangladeshi practicing architect, academician and social activist. He studied architecture from the first science and technology university of that country, SUST; Sylhet. He is now a lecturer in the department of architecture, Bangladesh University, Dhaka; where he conducts art appreciation courses, design classes and seminars and also researches as a free scholar. He specializes cultural studies, philosophy of art and architectural history. Throughout his student life; he was engaged in different extra-curricular activities and valued culture as means to Bangladesh’s socio-cultural and architectural sphere of encouragement within South Asia. As a result; he is spending most of his time on researches like this (as architecture is not aloof from art) to find out Bengal’s own identity which may appear unique in the field of art and architecture. He has published articles on architecture and art from several journals around the globe which includes countries like India, China, UK, USA, Australia, Nigeria and Indonesia. His recent study published from Australia about the Maxims of Khona and its impact over vernacular architectural practice in Bangladesh

Abstract:

The study is aimed to analyze the thermo climate analysis in different mud houses of village Mawna at Gazipur district near the capital city of Dhaka. For case studies, four different mud houses were selected while thermal comfort has constituted the results of the paper. A micro-climatic survey technique was used to simulate the temperature comfort level for inhabitants while human interaction with surface-atmosphere in the rural environment was considered meticulously. By using the thermal comfort indexes like PMV (predicted mean vote) and MRT (mean radiant temperature) of previous theoretical assumptions, it has revealed that the thermal comfort of mud house displays the PMV values are close to a comfortable level; surely better than any dwelling units in the city. This analysis of thermal comfort and the wind flow also showed how influential was the local environment to incorporate the climatic responsiveness of such architectural feature. To realize the core idea for thermal controlling through the approach of traditional technique, the whole construction process and the spatial quality of mud architecture was revaluated to find out which decisions had driven the local wisdom for the material selection and space organization in this particular way. For this, an elaborate literature review has been done to learn and figure out the possible role of architects or other building professionals on the further development of indigenous techniques and also include these outcomes in academic curriculum.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Wakil is working as a Research Scientist in the Water Desalination and Reuse Centre of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia. His research focused on thermal systems hybridization for overall system performance improvements. Dr. Wakil holds three international patents. To date, he published 20 peer-reviewed journal papers including Nature Middle East, 50 over conference papers and four book chapters. He also received two best research paper awards in international conferences. Their innovative hybrid desalination cycle, MEDAD cycle, won “GE-ARAMCO global water challenge” award for high efficiency and lowest water production cycle. He is also selected as a regional coordinator of International Desalination Association’s Young Leader Programme (IDA-YLP) for Middle East and Africa Region for 2015-2017. He is also a member of many professional organizations namely: International Desalination Association (IDA), American Society of Mechanical Engineer (ASME), Institute of Engineers of Pakistan (IEP) Lahore, Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (HVACR) Society of Pakistan, and Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC).

Abstract:

The primary energy consumption estimates in GCC region shows the highest growth rate in the World, 700mtoe by 2020 as compared to 350mtoe in 2010, mainly due to low efficiency industrial processes such as power and water production. In GCC countries, more than 40% of total energy is consumed in CCGT based power and desalination plants. All present low performance desalination processes are not only unsustainable for future water supplies but also polluting environment by adding tremendous amount of CO2. In 2009, GCC countries contributed to approximately 8% of the global CO2 emissions. For future sustainability, the present dominating thermally driven desalination processes such as multi effect desalination (MED) needs to improve. We proposed thermally driven tri-hybrid desalination cycle (NF+MED+AD) to overcome conventional MED process limitations. In this new cycle, the top brine temperature (TBT) can be raised to 125C by introducing nano-filtration (NF) feed pre-treatment and bottom brine temperature (BBT) limit can be extended to as low as 5C by integrating renewable energy driven adsorption (AD) cycle. The thermodynamic synergy of MED+AD hybrid cycle is demonstrated experimentally, boosting water production by 2 fold as same TBT. We also presented detailed mathematical model and transient simulation of tri-hybrid NF+MED+AD cycle. The results showed that the proposed cycle is one of the highest performance cycle reported in the literature up till now.

Speaker
Biography:

Sara is Ph.D. student at the Dow Centre. She obtained her Bachelor degree on Mechanical Engineering from the K.N.Toosi University of Technology in 2000. Since then, she worked in the oil and gas industry as project engineer and project manager in Persian Gulf mega projects. In 2012 she moved to Australia and mid 2013 took up a one‐year research project on Life Cycle Assessment of Solar Energy in Australia at the UQ Energy Initiative. After 12 challenging years dealing with fossil fuels and observing the real‐in‐site environmental impacts of conventional power generation technologies, she has now decided for a career change and to contribute to improving the environment. Her Ph.D. project involves renewable energy technologies, sustainable energy development and renewables policy. Her aim is to become part of the UQ researcher and lecturing community..

Abstract:

Scientific and social consensus about the risks of climate change is growing around the world and best evidenced by the recent commitments pledged under the Paris Climate protocol and subsequent ratification by 142 of the 197 participating countries, representing 95% of global emissions. In addition there are several global decarbonisation scenarios which outline pathways and future energy mixes with the specific objective of holding the global average temperature to less than 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. Typically these scenarios project terawatts of solar energy deployment over the next few decades. It has been highlighted that this rapid switch may cause limitations in the required natural resources and several life cycle assessments (LCA) have been carried out with a wide range of assumptions and methods to identify these critical materials. However, almost all these studies have discussed constraints around a single solar technology, typically PV and often in isolation to the broader industries that utilise the same materials. Here we consider the role of the solar sector in the International Energy Agency’s 2 Degree Scenario (IEA2DS) considering both PV and concentrated solar thermal (CST). The results show that installation of 0.7TW CST along with 3.5TW PV may not cause additional material constraints although to avoid major uncertainties around tellurium, silver and indium the share of CST should be increased.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Shu-San Hsiau got his PhD from California Institute of Technology (Mechanical Engineering) in 1993. He started his academic life at National Central University (Taiwan) since then. His major research areas include powder technology, energy technoloy (clean coal/biomass gasification and gas clean up, energy saving technology), avalanche and debris technology, additive manufacturing instrument design, etc. He has served as Chairman of Department of Mechanical Engineering, and also the Director of Graduate Institute of Energy Engineering. Professor Hsiau served as Associate Vice President for R&D from 2014/2 to 2017/1. Currently he is the director of Clean Coal Research Center at NCU.

Abstract:

The technology of dual fluidized bed (DFB) steam gasification has been well-known to generate product syngas of high quality with high heating value and free nitrogen. The present study investigates either combustion or gasification of biomass fuel in a lab-scale DFB gasifier. The fluid dynamics with heat and mass transfers taking place in a two-dimentional DFB system were performed by applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. A combination of fluid flow model, heat transfer model and species transport model was used to study the unsteady behaviors of the phases including process agents (air, steam), biomass fuel (paper reject) and bed material (silica sand) during the whole process. Our model was first validated with published studies, and then was developed to optimize the critical parameters and conditions affecting the system operation. Accordingly, a parametric study was conducted for the major factors, such as inlet air/steam velocities, operating temperatures, to determine their effects on the hydrodynamics, heat transfer characteristics and product yields. Some typical results were obtained for the fluid flow patterns, distributions of velocities, pressure, temperature and species’ concentration in different zones and along the height of the DFB system. It was found that the input parameters and the system geometry were important influences affecting modeling results, and thus system performance. All predicted results are expected to improve the design and efficiency of the practical systems. Further validation with corresponding experiments and modification are intended to make the model more convinced.