Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd World Congress and Expo on Green Energy Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Xingwu Wang

Alfred University, USA

Keynote: Impacts of Renewables on Electric Vehicle Demands

Time : 08.30-09.00

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xingwu Wang photo
Biography:

Dr. Xingwu Wang is a professor, Renewable Energy, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802, USA. He has published 90 papers and 45 US patents. His most recent research is on the renewable energy, electrical vehicles and sustainability. Dr. Xiaomin Li is a visiting professor at Alfred, currently on leave (from Henan University, China).

Abstract:

Electric vehicle demands have increased rapidly since 2010, and depend on renewables. Using panel data from fourteen countries between 2010 and 2015, we study impacts of seven factors in a multiple linear regression model. The factors include percentage of renewable energies in electricity generation, number of charging stations, education level, population density, gasoline price, GDP per capita and urbanization. The first four factors have apparent and positive impacts on the demands, and the last two factors don’t. The gasoline price affects the demands for BEVs (battery electric vehicles) more than that for PHEVs (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles). One percent increase in renewables would lead to approximately 2-6% increase in EV demands. Based on the results, policy implications are discussed.

Keynote Forum

Sebastian Helgenberger

Head IASS Energy Transition Programme, Germany

Keynote: Social Benefits of Renewables – lessons learned from Germany’s Energiewende

Time : 09:30-10:00

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sebastian Helgenberger photo
Biography:

Dr. Sebastian Helgenberger leads the “Multiple Benefits of Renewables” project at IASS Potsdam. In their research activities and international science-policy dialogues Sebastian and his team are giving particular emphasis on the social and economic benefits of renewable energies as drivers of accelerated transitions towards sustainable energy for all. Sebastian graduated in Environmental Sciences at Leuphana University Lüneburg and conducted his master thesis at ETH Zurich on knowledge co-creation among science and society in sustainability transformations. He also holds a PhD in socio-economics. Throughout his career Sebastian Helgenberger has been committed to advancing and experimenting with the transformative potential of science and research to accompany societal change.

Abstract:

Boosted by impressive technological innovation and cost reductions, renewable energy in a growing number of countries is now primarily considered for its social and economic benefits. Among the benefits of the emerging new energy world are opportunities for local value creation, for responding to growing energy demands and for reducing conflicts over scarce water, which are aggravated by fossil power generation. Allowing for distributed electricity generation, the rapidly expanding renewable energy world is opening up business models for many, including local communities, citizens and citizens’ cooperatives. Sebastian Helgenberger will illustrate the social dimension of renewable energies and the Energiewende (energy transition) – in Germany and internationally. He will share surprising experiences from Germany’s Energiewende, with citizens finding themselves on the driver seat of reshaping the energy market and they way we produce, consume and own energy. Similar developments connected to the societal drivers, game changers and opportunities of renewable energies can be observed around the globe – showing that energy transitions are about much more than energy.

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aaron Praktiknjo photo
Biography:

Aaron Praktiknjo has been an Assistant Professor of Energy Resource and Innovation Economics at RWTH Aachen University since 2015. Before joining RWTH Aachen, he was a team leader and lecturer at the Institute for Energy Engineering, TU Berlin, and served as a consultant for national and international agencies and companies. After studying industrial and civil engineering, Aaron Praktiknjo completed a PhD on the topic of energy supply security at the Chair of Energy Systems at TU Berlin, graduating in 2013 with highest honors. Aaron Praktiknjo has received awards for his research from the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE) and the European Energy Exchange (EEX).

Abstract:

In many countries such as Germany, the expansion in renewable power capacities in only a short time frame has been impressive. Simultaneously, conventional plants such as nuclear power plants are being phased-out of the energy system. But in contrast to conventional power plants, most of the renewable generators only pro-duce electricity if the weather conditions are right, e.g. the sun is shining or the wind is blowing. In general, there are deterministic and probabilistic methods to assess supply secu-rity. In the past, the four German transmission system operators (TSO) have used a deterministic approach (so-called forecast margin). However, with the increase of available data, we opt for a probabilistic approach to assess supply security due to its higher degree in detail of the results. Furthermore, when assessing supply security, the economic perspective also needs to be accounted for. Ideally, investments in supply security should only be made if the resulting benefits from an increase in supply security amounts at least to the in-vestment outlay. With our research, we want to contribute to the economic assess-ment of supply security.

Keynote Forum

Wolfram Sparber

Institute for Renewable Energy at Eurac Research, Italy

Keynote: How to reach renewable energy and climate targets in a cost efficient way – a dynamic energy model applied on regional scale

Time : 10:00-10:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wolfram Sparber photo
Biography:

Wolfram Sparber is heading the Institute for Renewable Energy at Eurac Research since it’s foundation in 2005. Eurac Research is an applied research centre located in Bolzano-Northern Italy. Since 2011 he is vice president of the European Technology and Innovation Platform for Renewable Heating and Cooling (ETIP RHC). Since 2016 he is chairman of the board of directors of the North Italian energy utility Alperia. Alperia is one of the largest renewable energy producers in Italy, and has a special focus on sustainable energy solutions. Wolfram Sparber studied applied physics at Graz University of Technology and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Abstract:

Many countries and regions in Europe and world wide have set ambitous climate and renewable energy targets to be met til 2020, 2030 and 2050. But with which energy system can such targets be met? What technology combination, to which extend, has to be applied to reach the target in a most cost effective way? Can the targets be reached considering technical, social, environmental and economic constraints? Within Eurac Research a method has been developed, that allows the modellers to give answers to these questions considering the hour by hour energy consumption for a referenece year. The North-Italian region of Southtyrol with its energy consumption, building stock, landscape and natural resources, transportation mix and its climate plan (target 1.5 ton CO2 emissions / capita till 2050) has been taken as a demo model. Technical, social and environmental constraints have been considered with regards to the possible expansion of renewable energy sources for electricity and heat production. The energy efficiency potential has been considered, especially with regard to the existing building stock. Therefore a detailed building clusterisation has been carried out with regard to building type, year of construction, applied construction technologies and possible refurbishment interventions and the related investment cost. Further more the mobility sector and its transition to zero emission transport has been considered. The energy model shows that the target can be reached with a series of measures based on today existing technologies. Considering the cost, not only the target scenarios are not more expensive than todays energy system, but especially a very relevant cost part is shifted from fossil fuels in local investment in energy efficiency and technology development; leading to an important push for the local economy. The model can be applied to other regions and countries.

Keynote Forum

Jared Moore

Meridian Energy and Policy Consulting, USA

Keynote: Thermal Hydrogen: An Emissions Free Hydrocarbon Economy

Time : 10:00-10:30

Green Energy Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jared Moore photo
Biography:

Jared Moore is an independent energy consultant based in Washington, D.C. advising on deep decarbonization of the energy sector. He has published in multiple peer reviewed journals including Environmental Science and Technology, Environmental Research Letters, Energy Procedia (GHGT-12), and the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. He is also a contributing author of the book Variable Renewable Energy and the Electricity Grid. He holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (2008) and a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University (2014).

Abstract:

Thermal Hydrogen is an energy system engineered to enable hydrocarbons as both an emissions free energy suppler and energy carrier. It is based upon the principle of using both products of water (or CO2) splitting: hydrogen (or CO) and oxygen. The H2 (CO) enables chemical energy storage and is intended primarily to provide heat, EV range, and timely/distributed electricity. The purpose of (pure) oxygen is to pre-empt the gas separation work inherent to Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). Pure oxygen also enables hydrocarbons to become increasingly competitive with decarbonization because it enables simpler and more efficient thermodynamic cycles: the Allam cycle for electricity generation and auto-thermal reforming for hydrogen/syngas generation. The supply and presence of hydrocarbon related chemicals also enables emissions free hydrogen energy carriers. Methanol (CH3OH, derived from syngas) is envisioned to serve as a substitute for gasoline to be used in solid oxide fuel cells. The resulting exhaust, carbonated water, is envisioned to be recollected and recycled. Ammonia (NH3) is envisioned to replace natural gas and is produced via the Haber-Bosch process. The nitrogen comes from an air separation unit where the oxygen is used to enable emissions free hydrocarbons. Overall, 90% of the hydrocarbons in the system are oxidzed by oxygen from electrolysis. All chemical energy is stored and distributed as liquids, thus enabling the densest energy storage and distribution system possible.